Setting the Table for Sunday Dinner


It took me nearly all day to make room for Mom’s dishes.

She was so very proud of them and they came out on special occasions.  The dishes meant business – but it was all good.

Billingsley Rose by Spode.

Her glass pattern:  Pinwheel.

I always thought, “how old-fashioned!”.

So – when Kevin and I were married, we (well, I with lots of persuasion) chose a more modern pattern – black and white.  Mom wasn’t a fan, but regardless, she was the one who purchased most of the pieces.   She was pleased that we were interested in “good dishes”.  Kevin (my husband)… not so much but he went along with the “tradition”.

Sunday was family day when my brother and I were growing up.  It was a day when the roast beef and Yorkshire pudding were presented.  If it wasn’t roast beef, it was chicken.  If it could be roasted, it would be good for Sunday.

We were all expected to be home – to make time for each other – to eat together.

The table-cloth was pressed and we were each given fresh, clean napkins.  I always thought, “good grief, what happens if I wipe my mouth after eating Mom’s pickled beets?”.  Nonetheless, the napkins were there.

The table looked beautiful on Sunday.  Nothing was too good for family.  And my God the dinner was delicious.  There would always be mashed potatoes and corn from the garden – either fresh or frozen.  Always, the pickle tray was loaded with olives and home-dilled pickles.  Delicious.  Sometimes Mom would treat us to an appetizer of shrimp – in special dishes that HAD to be on the matching saucer.

I opted today to go and visit Mom and Dad rather than take the dishes from the condo.  I am ready for them – but it is tough to pull them away from their rightful place.  It seems wrong to remove them from Mom and Dad’s place.

I purchased 12 white roses.  I kept 10 and took 2 to Mom and Dad – I placed one on each of their niches.  The sun was warm.  I didn’t pay much attention to my surroundings today, though.  I placed the roses.  It was important that Mom’s rose had baby’s breath and Dad’s had something more masculine.  I don’t know why.  1921 and 1924, I read.  The roses framed their plates and made them look very distinguished on this very special Sunday.  I felt the roses prepared them for Sunday dinner.  The other 10 roses are on my dinner table – just to be sure that Mom and Dad are with us on this very special Sunday dinner.

And so here we are – an hour from dinner and the table is set.  Our good dishes are out and the wine glasses sit ready for action at each place setting.  The pickle tray is loaded and the roast smells delicious.

It is Sunday night and the family will be here to dine together.  Nothing is more important than making sure that Sunday dinner is special.  There is just more to it than meets the eye.  Cuz today, nothing is more important than setting the table for Sunday dinner.

 

 

 

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Categories: Life's Lessons | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

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8 thoughts on “Setting the Table for Sunday Dinner

  1. kistemaker3@rogers.com

    Bon appetite!
    Sent from my BlackBerry device on the Rogers Wireless Network

  2. Wilma

    Memories of our own Sunday roast beef dinners…thank you Stacey 🙂

  3. I love family who believes the “best” is best used for family. 🙂 Wonderful wonderful post.

  4. Family, Good Food, Wine, a little laughter – maybe a lot of laughter, a time to reflect back, and a cozy corner for a nap…. 🙂

    • the nap.. that would have been the men in my family (grin). Women were off to the kitchen to do dishes and talk about life.

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